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Abich II Glacier

Abich II Glacier
Photo by Chuck Aaron and Bob Garbe 1989

The Abich II Glacier has long been an area of interest for ark researchers, but one of the most difficult areas to climb physically, and also politically since it faces the Armenian border, only 8 -10 miles away.

Photo by Ahmet Ali Arslan via Robin Simmons
Photo by Ahmet Ali Arslan 1989 via Robin Simmons

Ray Anderson is interested in a door-shaped object on the eastern summit peak, and another object he found in a slide from Dr. Hewitt approximately 1000 feet below in the Abich II Glacier. He believes these may be two sections of Noah's Ark, and is in agreement with the Ed Davis account. [Note: This location is much higher than Ed Davis originally stated] The middle object at approximately 15,500 feet (and other objects in the Abich II) are also of interest to ark researcher Dr. Don Shockey. In 1990, I was with Dr. Shockey when we were allowed numerous helicopter flights to survey the entire mountain. The Abich II Glacier and the object in the above Ahmet Ali Arslan photo were our top priority.

Elfred Lee and others have an interest in the "saddle" area between the two summit peaks. According to Lee, this is the area that George Hagopian claimed to have visited the Ark on 2 separate occasions in the early 1900's. In 1988, the Willis expedition eliminated the eastern summit region and the center (80 feet in both north and south directions) of the "saddle" area using subsurface radar. This means "if" the ark originally landed in the "saddle," that it must have moved down into the Abich II. A landing in this area would have considerably obstructed Noah's view. If the ark did not land in the "saddle," then the large western plateau would be the most likely area.

If Noah's Ark landed on Mount Ararat, a summit or near-summit landing would seem likely given the Biblical account mentioning that it took over 70 days for Noah to see other mountain peaks. This could also imply a restricted view. [See John Comber's web site on the subject of receding water] For there to be portions of Noah's Ark still intact in the Abich II Glacier, one would have to assume that the ark was already petrified like rock, prior to the slow journey down the Abich II Glacier, otherwise the glacial forces would have ground the ark to bits. If this assumption were true, it could explain the major ice disruption we see in the Abich II Glacier.

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